Python Data Hiding Tutorial – Complete Guide

Python, known for its simplicity and versatility, is one of the most popular programming languages in today’s tech-driven world. Now, if you’re learning Python, or already a seasoned coder using this language, Python’s concept of data hiding is an essential element to understand. It brings in secure coding practices, enhancing your Pythonic adventures.

What is Python Data Hiding?

Data hiding, also known as encapsulation, is a fundamental principle of Object-Oriented Programming (OOP). Python takes a unique twist in this approach, providing flexibility, yet enabling programmers to implement secure operations within their class and object structures.

In Python, data hiding refers to the practice of restricting direct access to the class’s data attributes (variables, lists, dictionaries etc.) and methods. This is done to prevent misuse or accidental alternation of critical data while still allowing specific operations to be performed.

What is It For?

So why do we hide data in Python?

  • Maintain orderly and secure code structure: Data hiding helps preserve the integrity of the class’s internal state, protecting it from unwanted interference.
  • Increasing code flexibility: As an advantage, changes to your class implementation won’t affect the rest of your code, as direct access is limited.
  • Minimize error possibilities: By restricting access, you can control what changes are made, thereby reducing the incidence of bugs and errors.

This principle might seem a bit stringent, but several noteworthy benefits justify its implementation. Besides enhancing overall code security, data hiding aids in building modular, maintainable, and robust Python programs. Mastery of this skill will solidify your software design skills and boost your productivity, making you an even more competent Python programmer.

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Basic Python Data Hiding

Hidden details of a class in Python are prefixed with double underscore “__”. Let’s take a look at an example.

class SimpleClass:
    __hiddenVariable = 0

    def add(self, increment):
        self.__hiddenVariable += increment
        print(self.__hiddenVariable)

In the above snippet, we made a simple class with a hidden variable __hiddenVariable. We’ve also defined an add method that adds to this hidden variable. Let’s see how it behaves.

simple = SimpleClass()  
simple.add(5)
simple.add(5)

Here, we instantiate a class, call the add method twice and increment the hidden variable by 5. But if you try to access the hidden variable directly…

print(simple.__hiddenVariable)

You encounter an attribute error, stating the class has no such attribute. This error shows how data hiding works in Python.

Accessing Hidden Data

While data hiding prevents direct access, you may sometimes need to manipulate these hidden variables. For this, you can use a special function in your class.

class SimpleClass:
    __hiddenVariable = 0

    def add(self, increment):
        self.__hiddenVariable += increment
        print(self.__hiddenVariable)

    def accessHidden(self):
        return self.__hiddenVariable

The method accessHidden returns the value of the hidden variable. You can now access the hidden variable value as:

simple = SimpleClass()  
simple.add(5)
simple.add(5)
print(simple.accessHidden())

You successfully see the value of your hidden variable without encountering any attribute error. This way, you grant controlled access to sensitive data.

Modifying Hidden Data

Suppose you also want to allow controlled modification of your hidden variable. You can use a special method in your class for this purpose, akin to the getter function we previously implemented.

class SimpleClass:
    __hiddenVariable = 0

    def add(self, increment):
        self.__hiddenVariable += increment
        print(self.__hiddenVariable)

    def accessHidden(self):
        return self.__hiddenVariable

    def modifyHidden(self, value):
        self.__hiddenVariable = value

Now the method ‘modifyHidden’ allows you to change the value of the hidden variable. Modify the hidden variable as below:

simple = SimpleClass()  
simple.add(5)
simple.add(5)
print(simple.accessHidden())
simple.modifyHidden(15)
print(simple.accessHidden())

The hidden variable value is successfully modified from 10 to 15.

Data Hiding in Inherited Classes

Data hiding also works in inherited classes in Python. An inherited class cannot directly access hidden data of the parent class. Here’s an example:

class Parent:
    __hiddenVar = 10

class Child(Parent):
    pass

child = Child()
print(child._Parent__hiddenVar)

In this example, the child class cannot access the hidden variable directly. Instead, you need to use the class name and the hidden variable name.

Why Data Hiding Matters

Python’s approach to data hiding might seem permissive compared to other languages, but it is based on the philosophy of “consenting adults”. Here are main reasons of data hiding:

  • Encapsulation: By hiding data inside a class and making it available through the methods, you are maintaining the integrity of the objects that the class is creating. This kind of a programming practice is known as encapsulation.
  • Prevent unexpected changes: If not for data hiding, variables could potentially be accessed from anywhere, and that can lead to variables being changed unexpectedly, making it very hard to debug.

Ultimately, with Python language, data hiding enhances the OOP paradigm by enforcing data encapsulation and by preventing unintended alteration of class data. It’s a crucial skill for Python coders to master!

Where to Go Next? How to Keep Learning?

As you explore Python and its world of possibilities, you’ll discover that mastering core concepts such as data hiding is just a stepping stone in your programming journey.

Sharpening your Python skills and growing from a beginner to a pro demands continuous efforts and a broad spectrum of knowledge – the challenge all coders must embrace proudly. Thankfully, we aim to make this journey an exciting one!

We invite you to explore further with our Python Programming Mini-Degree at Zenva Academy. Our Python Mini-Degree, a comprehensive, project-based course, provides a full introduction to Python. This versatile language is used in industries such as game development, AI, data science, and robotics.

The Python Mini-Degree curriculum covers coding basics, algorithms, object-oriented programming, game development, and app development, making use of libraries like Pygame, Tkinter, and Kivy. Trained by highly experienced instructors, you can benefit from live coding lessons, quizzes, and earn completion certificates along your learning path.

This Mini-Degree encourages hands-on experience, allowing learners to build their own games and apps, thereby cementing your knowledge while expanding your portfolio. Suitable for beginners and more experienced learners, our flexible learning options let you skip ahead to elements that align with your personal learning goals.

Our aim is to empower you with the Python skills needed to succeed in the job market, and potentially change careers.

For a more broad collection, feel free to browse through our full range of Python courses.

Conclusion

Whether you’re new to Python or an experienced developer, diving deep into the language’s data hiding concept as part of our interactive and project-based Python Programming Mini-Degree will enhance your coding abilities and open doors to new opportunities.

Becoming proficient in Python is a game-changer, and mastering its nuances is a stepping stone towards becoming a high-demand developer. At Zenva, we’re committed to supporting you in your coding journey, helping you pave your way to success in the digital world. So, stay curious, keep learning, and let’s code the future together.

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