EditorResourceTooltipPlugin in Godot – Complete Guide

Working with Godot 4 can be an exciting journey into game development, as it brings a myriad of functionalities for developers to create immersive and interactive games. Among the new features in Godot 4, the EditorResourceTooltipPlugin is a sleek tool that can greatly enhance the game development workflow, particularly when dealing with various types of resources. So, what is this all about, and why is it worth your attention? Stick around, and let’s explore the capabilities of the EditorResourceTooltipPlugin, how it can streamline your game-building process, and why mastering it can be a valuable addition to your development toolkit.

What Is EditorResourceTooltipPlugin?

EditorResourceTooltipPlugin is a class provided by Godot 4 which allows developers to create advanced tooltips for specific resource types within the Godot editor. These tooltips are not your average pop-ups; they’re custom-designed to give more context and information about the resources you’re working with, potentially including previews of visual assets like textures or models.

What Is It For?

Have you ever found yourself thumbing through an endless list of assets trying to remember which texture was which? Or perhaps you’ve squinted at tiny icons, guessing the details of each item? The EditorResourceTooltipPlugin comes to the rescue in such scenarios by providing a customizable preview that can appear when you hover over a resource. This feature is particularly useful for getting a quick glance at the assets without the need to open each one individually.

Why Should I Learn It?

For both budding and seasoned developers, efficiency and a streamlined workflow are keys to success when developing games. By incorporating the EditorResourceTooltipPlugin into your toolkit, you can:

– Enhance your productivity by quickly identifying and accessing the resources you need.
– Improve organization within your project by having a better overview of your assets.
– Save time that would otherwise be spent opening each resource separately.

Learning how to leverage this tool can make your time in the Godot editor more effective, enabling you to focus on the more creative aspects of game development.

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Setting Up EditorResourceTooltipPlugin

Before we dive into the examples, it’s crucial to set up the EditorResourceTooltipPlugin properly. Let’s start by initializing the plugin within the Godot editor.

First, create a new script that inherits from `EditorResourceTooltipPlugin`. Save it with a `.gd` extension.

extends EditorResourceTooltipPlugin

Next, we’ll need to override the `_forward_resource_tooltip()` method which is called by the Godot editor to check if the plugin can show the tooltip.

func _forward_resource_tooltip(path: String) -> bool:
    # Check if this plugin can handle the resource
    # For this example, we'll assume any resource can be handled
    return true

Creating a Basic Tooltip

Now, let’s create a simple tooltip that will display the resource’s path. To do this, override the `_get_resource_tooltip()` method.

func _get_resource_tooltip(path: String) -> Variant:
    var resource = load(path)
    return "Resource Path: " + resource.resource_path

This is a very basic example, but it can already be quite helpful when you want to quickly check the path of a resource.

Adding a Visual Preview to Tooltips

The real power of the EditorResourceTooltipPlugin comes from its ability to display a visual preview. Let’s start with displaying a thumbnail for image resources.

First, check if the resource is indeed an image by using `is` keyword:

func _get_resource_tooltip(path: String) -> Variant:
    var resource = load(path)
    if resource is Texture:
        var texture: Texture = resource
        # Generate a thumbnail for the texture
        var image_preview = texture.get_data().get_view()
        return image_preview
    else:
        return "Resource Path: " + resource.resource_path

This code snippet checks if the loaded resource is a Texture. If it is, it creates a thumbnail from it to be used as the tooltip.

Handling Different Resource Types

We can expand further on the idea by handling different types of resources and their previews. For instance, let’s add another branch to handle 3D models.

func _get_resource_tooltip(path: String) -> Variant:
    var resource = load(path)
    if resource is Texture:
        var texture: Texture = resource
        var image_preview = texture.get_data().get_view()
        return image_preview
    elif resource is PackedScene:
        # For this example, we assume PackedScene to be a 3D model
        return "3D Model: " + resource.resource_path
    else:
        return "Resource Path: " + resource.resource_path

With these code examples, we’ve set up a simple system that distinguishes between textures and 3D models, providing a visual representation for textures and a descriptive text for other resource types.

Improving the Visualization with Custom Styles

Finally, let’s add some styling to our tooltip to make it more appealing and possibly provide more information. This example demonstrates how to create a more complex tooltip that includes additional details, such as the resource type.

func _get_resource_tooltip(path: String) -> Variant:
    var resource = load(path)
    var tooltip = "Resource Type: " + resource.get_class() + "\nPath: " + resource.resource_path
    if resource is Texture:
        var texture: Texture = resource
        var image_preview = texture.get_data().get_view()
        return VBoxContainer.new().add_child(image_preview).add_child(Label.new().set_text(tooltip))
    else:
        return Label.new().set_text(tooltip)

This code snippet first generates a textual description of the resource, then it provides a VBoxContainer for Textures that includes both an image preview and the textual description.

With these essential examples, you now have a fundamental understanding of how to use the EditorResourceTooltipPlugin in Godot 4 to improve your workflow. These examples cover setting up the plugin, creating basic tooltips, adding visual previews, handling different resource types, and improving the visualization for an aesthetically pleasing and informative result.

Expanding Tooltip Functionality

To demonstrate how to further enhance the EditorResourceTooltipPlugin, let’s continue by adding more complexity and usability to our tooltips.

Customizing Tooltips for Audio Resources

For audio files, we can show the name of the audio track and its length. We start by checking if the resource is an `AudioStream` and then preparing the tooltip accordingly.

func _get_resource_tooltip(path: String) -> Variant:
    var resource = load(path)
    
    if resource is Texture:
        # ... existing texture handling code ...
    elif resource is AudioStream:
        var audio_stream: AudioStream = resource
        var tooltip_text = "Audio Track: " + resource.resource_path
        tooltip_text += "\nLength: " + str(audio_stream.get_length()) + " seconds"
        return tooltip_text
    else:
        # ... existing handling for other types ...

Here, we’ve added a new `elif` block that detects `AudioStream` resources and creates a tooltip displaying the audio track’s path and length.

Highlighting Script Variables

For scripts, it may be helpful to show a list of the script’s variables. We can access the script’s properties using `Script.get_script_property_list`.

func _get_resource_tooltip(path: String) -> Variant:
    var resource = load(path)
    
    if resource is Texture:
        # ... existing texture handling code ...
    elif resource is Script:
        var script: Script = resource
        var tooltip_text = "Script: " + resource.resource_path + "\nVariables:\n"
        for prop in script.get_script_property_list():
            tooltip_text += "- " + prop.name + ": " + prop.type + "\n"
        return tooltip_text
    else:
        # ... existing handling for other types ...

Here we add a block for `Script` resources, iterating over properties and appending each one’s name and type to the tooltip text.

Visualizing User-Defined Resource Types

Suppose you’ve created a custom resource type called `CharacterStats`. We want to analyze its properties and visualize them in the tooltip.

func _get_resource_tooltip(path: String) -> Variant:
    var resource = load(path)
    
    if resource is Texture:
        # ... existing texture handling code ...
    elif resource is CharacterStats:
        var stats: CharacterStats = resource
        var tooltip_text = "Character Stats:\n"
        tooltip_text += "Health: " + str(stats.health) + "\n"
        tooltip_text += "Strength: " + str(stats.strength) + "\n"
        tooltip_text += "Agility: " + str(stats.agility) + "\n"
        return tooltip_text
    else:
        # ... existing handling for other types ...

Now we have a branch that specifically handles `CharacterStats` resources, presenting essential properties like health, strength, and agility.

Creating Advanced Visual Layouts for Tooltips

Let’s say we want a more stylized layout for our texture previews instead of just the image. We can construct an interface with a thumbnail and additional information, such as dimensions and import settings. Here’s how you might create a more complex tooltip GUI for textures:

func _get_resource_tooltip(path: String) -> Variant:
    var resource = load(path)
    
    if resource is Texture:
        var texture: Texture = resource
        var vbox = VBoxContainer.new()

        var image_preview = texture.get_data().get_view()
        vbox.add_child(image_preview)
        
        var info_label = Label.new()
        info_label.text = "Dimensions: " + str(texture.get_width()) + "x" + str(texture.get_height())
        vbox.add_child(info_label)
        
        return vbox
    elif resource is AudioStream:
        # ... existing audio handling code ...
    elif resource is Script:
        # ... existing script handling code ...
    else:
        # ... existing handling for other types ...

Here, we construct a `VBoxContainer` and populate it with a thumbnail of the texture and a label with the texture’s dimensions.

Building on these examples, you’ve now seen how to tailor tooltips for a variety of resource types, from audio files to scripts to custom resource classes, and how to create a more engaging visual layout for your tooltips. These extensions of the EditorResourceTooltipPlugin can tremendously improve the user experience within the Godot editor, making the development process smoother and more intuitive.Adding interactivity to the tooltip can provide an even richer experience for developers. For example, suppose we want to enable clicking on parts of the tooltip to perform certain actions, such as opening a resource in Godot’s inspector or jumping to its location in the file system. Below are examples that extend the functionality of tooltips to make them interactive.

Interacting with the Resource Path

Let’s create a Button that, when clicked, will copy the resource path to the clipboard.

func _get_resource_tooltip(path: String) -> Variant:
    var resource = load(path)
    # ... existing code for handling different types ...
    
    var copy_path_button = Button.new()
    copy_path_button.text = "Copy Path"
    copy_path_button.connect("pressed", self, "_on_copy_path_pressed", [resource.resource_path])
    
    # Add the button to your existing layout
    # For this example, we'll assume we have a VBoxContainer named vbox
    vbox.add_child(copy_path_button)
    
    return vbox

func _on_copy_path_pressed(path: String):
    OS.set_clipboard(path)

This snippet introduces a new button that, when pressed, copies the resource’s path to the clipboard through the `OS.set_clipboard()` method.

Previewing Animations in Tooltips

For animation resources, we can display a preview of the animation within the tooltip. We will set up an `AnimationPlayer` and play the animation on loop.

func _get_resource_tooltip(path: String) -> Variant:
    var resource = load(path)
    # ... existing code for handling different types ...

    if resource is Animation:
        var anim: Animation = resource
        var anim_preview = AnimationPlayer.new()
        anim_preview.add_animation("preview", anim)
        anim_preview.play("preview")
        
        # Make sure to set up the AnimationPlayer node correctly
        # For simplicity, we're omitting additional setup code
        
        return anim_preview

The above code block assumes you’re familiar with the setup required to play `Animation` resources. It initializes an `AnimationPlayer` and plays the animation continuously for preview within the tooltip.

Custom Asset Actions

Sometimes, we might want to perform custom actions with our assets, such as opening a dialogue box or executing an editor script. This can be done by attaching a script to your resource, which is then executed when a button is clicked.

func _get_resource_tooltip(path: String) -> Variant:
    var resource = load(path)
    # ... existing code for handling types ...

    if resource is CustomResourceWithAction:
        var action_button = Button.new()
        action_button.text = "Perform Action"
        action_button.connect("pressed", resource, "execute_action")
        
        # Add the button to your tooltip
        vbox.add_child(action_button)
        
        return vbox

In this case, when the button is clicked, it calls the `execute_action` method defined in the `CustomResourceWithAction` class.

Tooltip Settings and Customization

Lastly, you may want to provide customization options for your tooltips. This could include changing font sizes, colors, or what information to display. You can store these settings in a configuration resource and read them when generating the tooltip:

var tooltip_settings = preload("res://tooltip_settings.tres")

func _get_resource_tooltip(path: String) -> Variant:
    var resource = load(path)
    # ... existing code for handling types ...

    var info_label = Label.new()
    info_label.text = "Dimensions: " + str(texture.get_width()) + "x" + str(texture.get_height())
    info_label.add_font_override("font", tooltip_settings.font)
    info_label.add_color_override("font_color", tooltip_settings.font_color)
    
    # Add the label to your layout
    vbox.add_child(info_label)
    
    return vbox

In this snippet, `tooltip_settings` is a custom `Resource` that holds user preferences for font and color, which are then applied to labels within the tooltip.

The ability to interact with tooltips not only speeds up resource management but also opens new doors to workflow automation. Interactivity within tooltips allows developers to connect deeply with the assets they’re working with, taking user experience within the Godot editor to new heights. With these code snippets, you now have an array of advanced features you can implement into your tooltips, offering a wide range of functionality tailored to your specific needs in the development process.

Continuing Your Godot Game Development Journey

Learning about the EditorResourceTooltipPlugin is just the beginning of the vast possibilities within Godot 4. To delve deeper into the world of game development and to broaden your expertise, we encourage you to explore our Godot Game Development Mini-Degree. This comprehensive curriculum offers a step-by-step guide to creating cross-platform games, covering essential topics from 2D and 3D game design to GDScript and gameplay mechanics across various game genres.

Whether you’re starting your game development journey or looking to sharpen your existing skills, our mini-degree caters to all levels of expertise. You’ll gain hands-on experience through project-based learning, constructing a dynamic portfolio that showcases your capabilities to potential employers or collaborators. If you aspire to widen your Godot knowledge and take on more complex projects, visit our selection of Godot courses to find the perfect fit for your learning path.

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Conclusion

In essence, mastering the EditorResourceTooltipPlugin in Godot 4 is like giving yourself a superpower in game development. With the right knowledge, you can create a more intuitive and rich development environment, saving time and energy that can be spent on actualizing the creative elements of your game. Remember, the tools we’ve discussed are just a fragment of what Godot 4 has to offer.

As you continue to develop your skills and take on new challenges, we at Zenva are here to guide you every step of the way. Dive into our Godot Game Development Mini-Degree to unlock a treasure trove of knowledge and resources that will elevate your game development journey. Let’s turn your game ideas into reality, one line of code at a time. Happy coding!

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